What’s a girl worth?

As a social media marketer I spend a tremendous amount of time on different platforms. One of them is called Imgur. On there I came across this post entitled “What’s a Girl Worth?” posted by Ben Randall. It’s a story of how 3 of his friends were kidnapped in Vietnam then sold into human trafficking in China and forced to marry. AT ONLY 16! I think it’s told best in his own words which I have shared below.

Before I am anything I am a mother. In a world where I have to constantly talk about human trafficking to my daughters in the “safety” of America I’m overwhelmed to see how rampant and worse it is in other countries. If you have a moment please help spread the word. If you have a penny to spare please help fund his campaign to create the documentary. He’s legit. I’ve checked him out as best I could. I’ll warn you what you are going to see in his story is frightening, overwhelming, sad, and not sugarcoated. But we need to talk about it and work to STOP IT! For our DAUGHTERS!

Bri Signature

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Girls are now cheaper than at any time in history.

Girls are now cheaper than at any time in history.

You can buy one in North America for as little as $5,000. In Europe, just $3,000. The average global price is less than $100, and in some places they cost just a few dollars.

You can use a girl for labour, for her organs – or even as a suicide bomber. By far the most popular use, though, is sex. In the words of one Ukrainian mobster: “You can make your money back in a week, if she’s pretty and young”.

5 years ago, 3 of my friends were kidnapped from Vietnam, and trafficked into China. My friends were “lucky” – they were forced into marriage, not prostitution. They were 16 years old.

After just a few months, one of my friends took her “husband’s” phone and ran away. She was brought home safely. My other 2 friends just disappeared. I didn’t know where they were, what had happened to them, or even if they were still alive.

I gave up everything to investigate my friends’ disappearances, and risked my life to try and find them in China – the world’s most populous country, with over 1.357 billion people (more than 4x the population of the US!). After 5 months of searching, to everyone’s surprise, I actually did find them. What you’re seeing here includes footage nobody’s ever seen before.

It was more than I’d ever hoped for – but that was just the beginning. By the time I found them, each of my 2 friends had given birth in China, and had to make a decision no mother should ever have to make: the choice between her child and her own freedom.

One of my friends escaped her “husband”, crossed 1,000 miles of China alone, and made it back through the dangerous border region to her home in Vietnam. This is some of the footage of the day she came home (she’s the one in the red dress – the lady with the blue scarf is her mom!). She has spent the past 2 years putting the pieces of her life back together.

My other friend risked her life to trap her trafficker, who was caught red-handed with 2 more trafficked girls and imprisoned in China. As crazy as it sounds, that’s only half the story. …So what are these girls worth? More than any price tag.

Let’s not kid ourselves. Helping 1 or 2 girls doesn’t really make a difference when they’re being taken in their thousands. I want to share my friends’ story as a feature documentary to raise awareness of the global human trafficking crisis, and to help protect vulnerable girls in Vietnam.

What you’ve seen here is just a tiny fraction of the incredible footage I have. Some of it has never been seen until today, and most of it has never been seen at all. I’ve been struggling for 3.5 years to get this project the attention and funding it needs, so I can share this story with the world. For the past 2 months I’ve been running a fundraising campaign.

If you want to make a difference, I’d love your help on the fundraiser – contributions will help finish the film, and launch a prevention program to protect vulnerable girls in Vietnam: http://www.sistersforsale.com

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